Global Engineering Week – Friday Events

The goal of GE week is to encourage a change in the engineering curriculum so that graduates are better able to anticipate the social impacts of their engineering projects and solve problems that arise as a result, from a range of different nontechnical perspectives.

All events are free to attend and we welcome engineers and non-engineers alike.

Thursday and Friday, 10:00-4:00, EV Atrium
Global Engineering Fair:
The GE Fair is an interactive exhibit showcasing engineering case studies. The viewer will be lead through a “choose-your-own-adventure”-type experience where they will have to make decisions. Based on the series of decisions made by the viewer, the outcome(s) and impacts of the project will change. The exhibit is intended for a broad audience and previous engineering experience is not required in order to fully experience the exhibit.

Friday 11:00-2:00, 2.184 and D3 EV Building
The Question of Congestion: An Interdisciplinary Socico-Technical Assessment Workshop:
Drawing on the Future City Game, this intensive, fast-paced workshop offers a hands-on, interactive opportunity to identify and build the skills necessary to work in interdisciplinary teams to address wicked problems – problems that are at their base, social or cultural problems with complex interdependencies, many stakeholders, many unforeseen consequences, and contradictory and changing requirements.
The workshop presents a systems approach methodology for understanding and formulating problems, gathering relevant information from stakeholders, generating potential solutions and validating them with users.

Friday 5:00-8:00, 762 Hall Building
Wine and Cheese Event: Panel Discussion and Award Presentation
The panel will discuss the question, “How do we prepare for wicked problems?” This will be followed by the presentation of the GE Award to a faculty member who best incorporates global engineering into his or her teaching, and a reception.

Global Engineering Week Thursday Events

Thursday and Friday, March 13th-14th, 10:00-4:00, EV Building Atrium by windows
Global Engineering Fair:

The GE Fair is an interactive exhibit showcasing engineering case studies. The viewer will be lead through a “choose-your-own-adventure”-type experience where they will have to make decisions. Based on the series of decisions made by the viewer, the outcome(s) and impacts of the project will change. The exhibit is intended for a broad audience and previous engineering experience is not required in order to fully experience the exhibit.

Thursday March 13th, 3:00-5:30, 763 Hall Building
From Cohabitation to Accessing Citizen Expertise: Incorporating Social Considerations in the Planning of Infrastructure Projects:

This presentation will discuss:
- The evolution of the relationship between infrastructure and communities
- Principles of community engagement and public participation in large projects
- The particular challenges and opportunities faced by engineers
It will draw on a study of Quebec companies conducted by the speaker’s firm in 2010, as well as some past projects and the speaker’s own reflections.

Thursday March 13th, 6:00-7:00, 763 Hall Building
Information and Communication Technologies for Development (ICT4D): Social Context, Challenges, Application Use Cases with Roch Glitho:

Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) applications (e.g. Web browsing, online social networks) play a critical role in all facets of business and everyday day life in the developed world. However, they are far less widespread in the developing world, although they can potentially be powerful development catalysts. A reason is that they rely on assumptions (e.g. literacy, Internet connectivity) that do not necessarily hold in the developing world. ICT4D is an emerging engineering field which focuses on adapting and creating ICT technologies to enable applications that cater to the specific needs of the developing world. There are currently several industrial ICT4D R&D centers, academic research labs, conferences, international projects / initiatives. However, the field remains relatively obscure to many people due to the general (but false) belief that ICT solutions for the developed world can be trivially adapted to the developing world’s social context.
This speech focuses on the ins and outs of ICT4D. The social context is introduced. Poor literacy rates and poor Internet connectivity are its key characteristics. The challenges are discussed. Some of them are technical while others are social. Several application use cases are reviewed. They include spoken Web (or a Web for the semi-literates) and inclusive social networks (or social networks that include those who can neither read nor write and/or do not have Internet connections).

Global Engineering Week – Wednesday Events

 

The goal of GE week is to encourage a change in the engineering curriculum so that graduates are better able to anticipate the social impacts of their engineering projects and solve problems that arise as a result, from a range of different nontechnical perspectives.

All events are free to attend and we welcome engineers and non-engineers alike.

Wednesday 11:45-1:00, 760 Hall Building
Role Playing for Product, Function, and Needs Focused Design:
Role playing games can be used to allow designers and innovators move beyond the team context to envision user’s needs, user’s interaction, ease of use, environment, setting, potentialities, etc. Students practice generating ideas through “walk-throughs” that recreate observed user situations as a means of uncovering critical questions, hidden assumptions, preconceptions, and complexities. This workshop is focused on designing through role-playing and scenario building in order to better understand user requirements and to think beyond preconceived ideas. The three different foci of design (product/function/needs) is intended to highlight the strengths of role-playing for understanding user’s needs.

Wednesday 2:30-3:30, 760 Hall Building 
The Role of Scientists and Engineers in Government, with Marc Garneau:
Former astronaut and current member of parliament, Marc Garneau, will speak about the role of scientists and engineers in the higher levels of government.The talk will be followed by a Q&A.
We will also be selling samosas on the fourth floor of the Hall Building from 12:00-5:00.

Visit the event page on Facebook for a full list of the week’s events, or see the schedule on here.

New Samosa Doodle

Hey guys! Every Wednesday from 12-5 we sell samosas on the fourth floor of the Hall Building to fundraise for various projects we have, such as the Junior Fellowship program and Global Engineering week! They’re only $1 and we have been selling out every week. Come by and say hi, or if you would like to get involved, you can sign up here to help out at the table!

Global Engineering Award nominations

The Global Engineering Award (GE Award) is intended to recognize the contribution of a professor in the Faculty of Engineering and Computer Science for their contribution to Global Engineering practice.

To be nominated for the award, the ENCS professor should demonstrate excellence in one of the following GE areas through their teaching:

Problem analysis:
Highlights the complexity of the subject by going beyond equations and guidelines

Design:
Mentions innovative and creative design possibilities.
Mentions design possibilities from around the world, both in developed and developing countries.
Offer design opportunities for students on open-ended or complex issues.

Use of engineering tools:
Include tools, techniques and theories from social sciences to complement the engineer’s mathematical toolbox.

Individual and team work:
Make students work on team projects, either during class time or as an assignment.

Communication skills:
Offer students opportunities to practice their communication skills
Favor the active participation and contribution of the students
Include formal and informal oral presentations

Impact of engineering on society and the environment:
Include topics of sustainability and mention green options
Mention the impact of the subject on society, both at the local and global level and mention fair options.
Include a research paper where the students explore the impact on society and the environment of a topic related to the course.

Ethics and equity:
Link the subject to present or past ethical debates

Award criteria
The nominated professor must:

-be a member of the ENCS faculty at Concordia (either full-time or part-time). Professors housed in the Center for Engineering in Society are excluded.
-demonstrate one or more of the global engineering teaching aspects outlined above, preferably in all of their classes

How to nominate a professor:
Email a paragraph describing why the professor should get the GE award to ewb@ecaconcordia.ca. Paragraphs should be approximately 150 words. Please include your name and area of study.

Selection Criteria:
The winner will be selected based on the quality of the nomination. Multiple nominations by different parties is viewed favourably by the award committee.

If a suitable candidate is not nominated by the ENCS student body, the EWB GE Award committee reserves the right to choose an awardee themselves.

Deadline: Friday, March 7th, 2014